High school students working together on a computer. Photo courtesy of Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for American Education: Images of Teachers and Students in Action. Capital City participated in this photo project during the 2016-2017 school year.

"We strive to be data driven or data informed in education these days, but typically we limit our vision of who can productively use data: school leaders, coaches and teachers. Students are left out.  When students are equipped to analyze data for their own learning… the power of data as an engine for growth is centered where it has the greatest potential to improve learning — with students." 
Ron Berger, Chief Academic Officer, EL Education

Middle school teacher and students

THESE RESOURCES FOCUS ON THE FOLLOWING LEARNING TARGET:

  • I can identify planning, organization and instructional tools to engage students to work with their own data.

WHAT ARE LEARNING TARGET TRACKERS?

Learning Target Trackers give students structure to reflect on their own growth and own their progress. At the same time, they help teachers understand where students are with the lesson to inform next steps with instruction, differentian and scaffolding. 

EXAMPLES OF SHORT TERM AND LONG TERM LEARNING TARGET TRACKERS

Preview of Learning Target Tracker
Long term learning target tracker

There are also various informal assessments educators can use to collect data from students themselves on their level of understanding. EL Education outline numerous effective strategies, including:
 

  • Fist to Five or Thumbs up/Thumbs down: To show degree of agreement, readiness for tasks, or comfort with a learning target/concept, students can quickly show their thinking by putting their thumbs up, to the side or down; or by holding up (or placing a hand near the opposite shoulder) a fist for 0/Disagree or 1-5 fingers for higher levels of confidence or agreement. 
     
  • Red/Yellow/Green Cards: Students have red, yellow, and green objects accessible (e.g. popsicle sticks, poker chips, cards), and when prompted to reflect on a learning target or readiness for a task, they place the color on their desk that describes their comfort level or readiness (red: stuck or not ready; yellow: need support soon; green: ready to start). Teachers target their support for the reds first, then move to yellows and greens. Students change their colors as needed to describe their status.
     

Read this resource from EL Education to learn about other strategies to check for understanding.

Top photo courtesy of Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for American Education: Images of Teachers and Students in Action. Capital City participated in this photo project during the 2016-2017 school year.