Library Highlights: January 23, 2015

Library Highlights: January 23, 2015

Hello, CCPCS friends and family!

The library is back in full swing as we welcome students back from winter break and snowy days. Here’s a brief overview of what we’ve been up to in the library, and how you can get involved. We hope you all had a wonderful weekend, as well, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

Capital City recently held a showcase, on Thursday, January 15th, in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Staff, students, and family members alike paid tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. Although the holiday was on Monday, we still received many requests in the library this week for materials about Martin Luther King Jr! In the library, we have several resources to celebrate and showcase the work Dr. King and his fellow activists accomplished. (You will need a Koha login in order to access these books, but you can also ask a librarian for help!) A few books include:

Marching to the mountaintop : How poverty, labor fights, and civil rights set the stage for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s final hours by Ann Bausum.

Examines the link between the 1968 Memphis sanitation strike and the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., discussing how the strike, the media, politics, the civil rights movement, and the labor protests all laid the foundations for what many consider to be King’s greatest speech, given just days before he was killed, and how that speech and King’s death influenced the end of the strike.

CCPCS Call Number: 323.092 BAU. You can find this book in the nonfiction section (dark blue labels) of the upper library.

We March by Shane Evans

Illustrations and brief text portray the events of the 1963 march in Washington, D.C., where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a historic speech.

CCPCS Call Number: E EVA. You can find this book in the picture books section (light pink labels) of the lower library.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day : honoring a Civil Rights hero by Amanda Doering

Presents an introduction to Martin Luther King Jr. Day, in simple text with illustrations, explaining what it is, how it started, and the how it is celebrated.

CCPCS Call Number: 323 DOE. You can find this book in the nonfiction section (light blue labels) of the lower library.

And we have even more! Ask a librarian for help in finding biographies, poetry, fiction, or anything else you’d like to read in celebration of Dr. King.

Winter Reading Wonderland

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Ms. I created a library display that’s perfect for cold, snowy days. On this display, you’ll find books that are all about snow and winter. There are picture books, junior fiction books, and chapter books for lower and middle school students to enjoy. If you’d like to learn about another culture, Ms. I’s display also showcases several legends and stories about Native American and Alaskan cultures and communities!

Books Pictured:

1) The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich

Omakayas, a seven-year-old Native American girl of the Ojibwa tribe, lives through the joys of summer and the perils of winter on an island in Lake Superior in 1847.

 CCPCS Call Number: F ERD. You can find this book in the fiction section of the lower library, in the Winter is Here display.
2) Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George

An Eskimo girl lost on the North Slope of Alaska is befriended by a pack of wolves.

 CCPCS Call Number: F GEO. You can find this book, and its sequels, in the fiction section of the lower library, in the Winter is Here display.
New Books & Series Spotlight
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Ms. Browne has put together several wonderful displays for teachers and high school students. On the shelves facing the circulation desk, you can find new fiction, nonfiction, and graphic novels! On the shelves facing the upper library tables, you’ll find series spotlights. (Ms. Kinnamont just read and really recommends Cindera science fiction reimagining of Cinderella, and she found that book because of Ms. Browne’s display!)
Books Featured (New Nonfiction Display):
1) This is Warhol by Catherine Ingram
A biography of pop artist Andy Warhol that explores the world around his work, including his life and the 1960s counterculture.
CCPCS Call Number: 709.2 ING. You can find this number in the nonfiction section (dark blue labels) of the upper library. It is currently in the new nonfiction display, on the shelves facing the upstairs circulation desk.

Offers an overview of crime and the American criminal justice system, using extensive examples of real cases to illustrate difficult questions about what is considered criminal and what punishment is appropriate for different types of crimes.

CCPCS Call Number: 364.973 KAN. You can find this book in the nonfiction section (dark blue labels) of the upper library. It is currently in the new nonfiction display, on the shelves facing the upstairs circulation desk.

 

3) Factory Farming: Current Controversies by Debra A. Miller

Presents varying viewpoints on the ethics, health aspects, and environmental impacts of factory farming, and looks at the future of the industry.

 CCPCS Call Number: 636 FAC. You can find this book in the nonfiction section (dark blue labels) of the upper library. It is currently in the new nonfiction display, on the shelves facing the upstairs circulation desk. 

Traces the history of the film series from the difficult creation of the original film to the preparations for a new trilogy, providing portraits of the people who labored behind the scenes to turn George Lucas’ idea into a legend.

 CCPCS Call Number: 791.43 TAY. You can find this book in the nonfiction section (dark blue labels) of the upper library. It is currently in the new nonfiction display, on the shelves facing the upstairs circulation desk.